Jump to :     |    View All Lists    |    FAQ
List: Carolina-Leps
Date: Tue, 29 Aug 2017 11:24:18 -0400
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinaleps Mailing List) <carolinaleps...>
Subject: Hostplant(s) of Intricate Satyr?

--94eb2c1cdb624dde4f0557e60138
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7BIT

I am not sure if there is any information yet on the hostplant(s) of the
recently described Intricate Satyr (*Hermeuptychia intricata*). I have now
been to the Island Creek area of Croatan National Forest in Jones County
twice, and this high pH site (underlain by marl) has an abundance of a
"slender-inflorescenced" *Chasmanthium*, which I think is *C. sessiliflorum*.
[*Uniola sessiliflora* is the old name.] You can't walk the trail here
without noticing this grass, which is rather scarce elsewhere in the state
(and limited to the Coastal Plain). It is a State Watch List species,
according to the NC Natural Heritage Program. It grows in hardwood
forests, but not necessarily wetland ones or swamps. Because it is rather
scarce, I wonder if it is mostly found on higher pH soils.

This grass is very similar to *C. laxum*, which is found across the state
but is scarce in the mountains. I suppose this grass could be an Intricate
Satyr hostplant, but if so, the distribution of the butterfly doesn't match
the plant. I think the Carolina Satyr uses a variety of forest grasses,
including probably the widespread *C. latifolium* (river-oats), as well as
the abundant non-native weed *Microstegium vimineum*. However, I should
stress that I have never seen a satyr oviposit on anything; I'm just not
that patient!

At any rate, I'm speculating that a hostplant for Intricate Satyr in NC (if
not also SC) is Longleaf Spikegrass (*Chasmanthium sessiliflorum*).

Thoughts?

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

--94eb2c1cdb624dde4f0557e60138
Content-Type: text/html; charset="UTF-8"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<div dir=3D"ltr"><div><div><div><div><div>I am not sure if there is any inf=
ormation yet on the hostplant(s) of the recently described Intricate Satyr =
(<i>Hermeuptychia intricata</i>). I have now been to the Island Creek area =
of Croatan National Forest in Jones County twice, and this high pH site (un=
derlain by marl) has an abundance of a &quot;slender-inflorescenced&quot; <=
i>Chasmanthium</i>, which I think is <i>C. sessiliflorum</i>.=C2=A0 [<i>Uni=
ola sessiliflora</i> is the old name.]=C2=A0 You can&#39;t walk the trail h=
ere without noticing this grass, which is rather scarce elsewhere in the st=
ate (and limited to the Coastal Plain).=C2=A0 It is a State Watch List spec=
ies, according to the NC Natural Heritage Program.=C2=A0 It grows in hardwo=
od forests, but not necessarily wetland ones or swamps.=C2=A0 Because it is=
rather scarce, I wonder if it is mostly found on higher pH soils.<br><br><=
/div>This grass is very similar to <i>C. laxum</i>, which is found across t=
he state but is scarce in the mountains. I suppose this grass could be an I=
ntricate Satyr hostplant, but if so, the distribution of the butterfly does=
n&#39;t match the plant.=C2=A0 I think the Carolina Satyr uses a variety of=
forest grasses, including probably the widespread <i>C. latifolium</i> (ri=
ver-oats), as well as the abundant non-native weed <i>Microstegium vimineum=
</i>.=C2=A0 However, I should stress that I have never seen a satyr oviposi=
t on anything; I&#39;m just not that patient!<br><br></div>At any rate, I&#=
39;m speculating that a hostplant for Intricate Satyr in NC (if not also SC=
) is Longleaf Spikegrass (<i>Chasmanthium sessiliflorum</i>).<br><br></div>=
Thoughts? <br><br></div>Harry LeGrand<br></div>Raleigh<br><div><div><br><di=
v><div><div><br><br><br><br></div></div></div></div></div></div>

--94eb2c1cdb624dde4f0557e60138--