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List: Carolina-Leps
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2020 11:03:46 -0400
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinaleps Mailing List) <carolinaleps...>
Subject: Re: Weymouth Woods butterfly count

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Thank goodness Brian's WEWO group(s) found FOUR species of Satyrium,
including Coral. And, even with 3 parties, and the weather was reasonably
good -- it didn't hamper me -- we managed a "whopping" 22 species --
terrible. But, we are not to blame! Note the complete lack of any
browns/satyrs/pearly-eyes, no anglewings, TWO individuals of grass skippers
(thankfully good ones); Palamedes in-between broods, etc. It wasn't for
lack of searching.

As I reported from my part late on Monday, you can add a LOT of good birds
to all of these odonates and herps -- Red-cockaded Woodpeckers, many
Bachman's Sparrows, a singing Lark Sparrow at close range, Common
Nighthawks, Loggerhead Shrike, Swainson's Warbler, and many others.

Note that, many years ago, Scott Hartley (the former long-time park
superintendent) held the count in mid-late July, when the *Clethra* was in
full bloom. I assisted in 5 or more of them, as did Tom Howard and a few
others. Instead of the 5 hairstreaks we got on this June count, you get a
whole different set of hairstreaks on the *Clethra*: Great Purple (fairly
easy), White-M (a few usually), Red-banded (common), and a few Hessel's
(away from Weymouth however); not to mention the ever-present Gray. And,
more skippers are out, including a lot of Confused Cloudywings to go along
with Silver-spotteds, Hoary Edges, and a bunch of others, including some
grass skippers. Gardens in the area are better, as well. Thus, Brian may
want to consider a count at that time period, though NABA allows only a
single count in a set period of days (i.e., June and July); but, you MAY
also do a spring count (pre-June) and a post-July (August onward) count in
the same circle. Some places in the country DO have 3 such counts, a
spring, summer, and fall count. By early August, the *Clethra* might be on
the wane, however, but still the same butterflies would be out, and more
other species also -- though August is a busy month for butterfly counts
elsewhere in the state.

Lastly -- Here is my plea -- *Everyone who does butterflying in the
Carolinas should have one or more additional aspects of natural history to
look at or photograph when in the field*. There are simply too many dull
periods when you can go 15 or more minutes without a butterfly; you need to
be interested in birds, dragonflies and damselflies, wildflowers or other
native plants, reptiles and amphibians, mushrooms, beetles and bees, and/or
other aspects of natural history "to fall back on". I don't want folks to
give up on butterflying when things are so slow, as they are getting now
and will be in many places for the next month (i.e, "the doldurms"). And,
Brian and Kyle found quite a few RARE species of dragonflies and
damselflies, not to mention a few lifers. TWO species of Shadowdragons!
That's awesome!

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh


On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 10:32 AM Brian Bockhahn <carolinaleps...>
wrote:

> 8 counters in three parties counted on 6/8/2020 tallying 22 species. It
> was foggy with light mist in the morning, clearing and sunny in late
> afternoon with temps in the 80s. As always it=E2=80=99s quantity of qual=
ity
> instead of overall diversity. Harry=E2=80=99s plea was heard and we had =
pretty
> thorough coverage in Sandhills, Naked and Drowning Creek, Lake Aberdeen,
> Weymouth, Boyd and Paint Hill tracts. Our Harry shunned group of six was
> needed to find all the Satyrium. And yes the birds, dragonflies and
> herps were just as productive if not stealing the show form this expected
> doldrum count of Satyriums. Worth it. Though I'm now counting tick and
> chigger bites after the fact...
>
>
>
> Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 10
>
> Spicebush Swallowtail 2
>
>
>
> Cloudless Sulphur 1
>
> Little Yellow 1
>
>
>
> Coral Hairstreak 1
>
> Edwards Hairstreak 25
>
> Kings Hairstreak 12
>
> Banded Hairstreak 2
>
> Gray Hairstreak 1
>
> Eastern Tailed Blue 2
>
> Summer Azure 8
>
>
>
> American Snouth 1
>
> Variegated Fritillary 13
>
> Pearl Crescent 5
>
> American Lady 6
>
> Red Admiral 1
>
> Common Buckeye 212
>
>
>
> Southern Cloudywing 1
>
> Horaces Duskywing 9
>
> Zarrucos Duskywing 6
>
> Dotted Skipper 1
>
> Dion Skipper 1
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Weymouth woods =E2=80=93 Scotland Lake =E2=80=93 Lake Bagget =E2=80=93 Wa=
tson Lake
>
>
>
> Swamp Darner 0-1-0-0
>
> Common Sandragon 0-1-0-0
>
> Prince Baskettail 0-0-0-8
>
> Alabama Shadowdragon 0-0-2-0 (LIFER)
>
> Cinnamon Shadowdragon 0-0-1-0
>
>
>
> Banded Pennant 0-1-3-3
>
> Ornate Pennant 0-75-15-0
>
> Eastern Pondhawk 8-30-4-4
>
> Little Blue Dragonlet 0-6-3-0
>
> Golden-winged Skimmer 0-3-2-1
>
> Yellow-sided Skimmer 3-4-0-0
>
> Elfin Skimmer 0-120-20-0
>
> Blue Dasher 1-3-0-3
>
> Eastern Amberwing 0-5-4-7
>
> Carolina Saddlebags 0-5-1-0
>
> Black Saddlebags 0-1-0-0
>
>
>
> Ebony Jewelwing 8-0-2-0
>
> Sparkling Jewelwing 1-3-0-0
>
> Elegant Spreadwing 0-1-0-0
>
> Swamp Spreadwing 0-1-0-0
>
> Variable Dancer 35-10-25-0
>
> Seepage Dancer 0-105-40-0
>
> Burgundy Bluet 0-1-1-0
>
> Cherry Bluet 0-91-1-0
>
> Orange Bluet 0-1-2-4
>
> Pale Bluet 0-1-0-0
>
> Attenuated Bluet 0-10-1-2
>
> Sphagnum Sprite 0-2-5-0
>
> Lilypad Forktail 0-6-2-55
>
> Citrine Forktail 0-20-3-0
>
> Fragile Forktail 0-40-10-0
>
>
>
> HERPS
>
> Cottonmouth =E2=80=93 (2) 1 in defensive coil on surface of water, vibrat=
ing tail
> and gaping at us
>
> Yellow-bellied Slider
>
> Sandhills Salamander =E2=80=93 Undescribed Eurycea new species 2 =E2=80=
=93 1 beautiful
> adult
>
> Southern Cricket Frog
>
> PINE BARRENS TREEFROG =E2=80=93 heard a few, tracked one down for amazing=
photos
>
> Copes gray treefrog
>
> Pine woods treefrog
>
> Fowlers Toad
>
> Southern Toad
>
> Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad
>
> Carpenter Frog
>
> Eastern Fence Lizard
>
> Green Anole
>
> Ground Skink
>
> Six-lined Racerunner
>
>
> --
> Brian Bockhahn
> <birdranger248...>
>
>

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<div dir=3D"ltr"><div>Thank goodness Brian&#39;s WEWO group(s) found FOUR s=
pecies of Satyrium, including Coral.=C2=A0 And, even with 3 parties, and th=
e weather was reasonably good=C2=A0 -- it didn&#39;t hamper me -- we manage=
d a &quot;whopping&quot; 22 species -- terrible.=C2=A0 But, we are not to b=
lame!=C2=A0 Note the complete lack of any browns/satyrs/pearly-eyes, no ang=
lewings, TWO individuals of grass skippers (thankfully good ones); Palamede=
s in-between broods, etc.=C2=A0 It wasn&#39;t for lack of searching.<br></d=
iv><div><br></div><div>As I reported from my part late on Monday, you can a=
dd a LOT of good birds to all of these odonates and herps -- Red-cockaded W=
oodpeckers, many Bachman&#39;s Sparrows, a singing Lark Sparrow at close ra=
nge, Common Nighthawks, Loggerhead Shrike, Swainson&#39;s Warbler, and many=
others.</div><div><br></div><div>Note that, many years ago, Scott Hartley =
(the former long-time park superintendent) held the count in mid-late July,=
when the <i>Clethra</i> was in full bloom.=C2=A0 I assisted in 5 or more o=
f them, as did Tom Howard and a few others.=C2=A0 Instead of the 5 hairstre=
aks we got on this June count, you get a whole different set of hairstreaks=
on the <i>Clethra</i>:=C2=A0 Great Purple (fairly easy), White-M (a few us=
ually), Red-banded (common), and a few Hessel&#39;s (away from Weymouth how=
ever); not to mention the ever-present Gray.=C2=A0 And, more skippers are o=
ut, including a lot of Confused Cloudywings to go along with Silver-spotted=
s, Hoary Edges, and a bunch of others, including some grass skippers.=C2=A0=
Gardens in the area are better, as well.=C2=A0 Thus, Brian may want to con=
sider a count at that time period, though NABA allows only a single count i=
n a set period of days (i.e., June and July); but, you MAY also do a spring=
count (pre-June) and a post-July (August onward) count in the same circle.=
=C2=A0 Some places in the country DO have 3 such counts, a spring, summer, =
and fall count.=C2=A0 By early August, the <i>Clethra</i> might be on the w=
ane, however, but still the same butterflies would be out, and more other s=
pecies also -- though August is a busy month for butterfly counts elsewhere=
in the state. <br></div><div><br></div><div>Lastly -- Here is my plea -- <=
u>Everyone who does butterflying in the Carolinas should have one or more a=
dditional aspects of natural history to look at or photograph when in the f=
ield</u>.=C2=A0 There are simply too many dull periods when you can go 15 o=
r more minutes without a butterfly; you need to be interested in birds, dra=
gonflies and damselflies, wildflowers or other native plants, reptiles and =
amphibians, mushrooms, beetles and bees, and/or other aspects of natural hi=
story &quot;to fall back on&quot;.=C2=A0 I don&#39;t want folks to give up =
on butterflying when things are so slow, as they are getting now and will b=
e in many places for the next month (i.e, &quot;the doldurms&quot;).=C2=A0 =
And, Brian and Kyle found quite a few RARE species of dragonflies and damse=
lflies, not to mention a few lifers.=C2=A0 TWO species of Shadowdragons!=C2=
=A0 That&#39;s awesome!<br></div><div><br></div><div>Harry LeGrand<br></div=
><div>Raleigh=C2=A0 <br></div><div><br></div></div><br><div class=3D"gmail_=
quote"><div dir=3D"ltr" class=3D"gmail_attr">On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 10:32 =
AM Brian Bockhahn &lt;<a href=3D"mailto:<carolinaleps...>">carolinaleps=
@duke.edu</a>&gt; wrote:<br></div><blockquote class=3D"gmail_quote" style=
=3D"margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding=
-left:1ex"><div dir=3D"ltr"><div dir=3D"ltr">

<p>8 counters in three parties counted on 6/8/2020 tallying
22 species.<span>=C2=A0 </span>It was foggy with light mist
in the morning, clearing and sunny in late afternoon with temps in the 80s.=
<span>=C2=A0 </span>As always it=E2=80=99s quantity of quality instead of
overall diversity.<span>=C2=A0 </span>Harry=E2=80=99s plea was
heard and we had pretty thorough coverage in Sandhills, Naked and Drowning
Creek, Lake Aberdeen, Weymouth, Boyd and Paint Hill tracts.<span>=C2=A0 </s=
pan>Our Harry shunned group of six was needed to
find all the Satyrium.<span>=C2=A0 </span>And yes the birds,
dragonflies and herps were just as productive if not stealing the show form
this expected doldrum count of Satyriums.=C2=A0 Worth it.=C2=A0 Though I&#3=
9;m now counting tick and chigger bites after the fact...</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 10</p>

<p>Spicebush Swallowtail 2</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>Cloudless Sulphur 1</p>

<p>Little Yellow 1</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>Coral Hairstreak 1</p>

<p>Edwards Hairstreak 25</p>

<p>Kings Hairstreak 12</p>

<p>Banded Hairstreak 2</p>

<p>Gray Hairstreak 1</p>

<p>Eastern Tailed Blue 2</p>

<p>Summer Azure 8</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>American Snouth 1</p>

<p>Variegated Fritillary 13</p>

<p>Pearl Crescent 5</p>

<p>American Lady 6</p>

<p>Red Admiral 1</p>

<p>Common Buckeye 212</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>Southern Cloudywing 1</p>

<p>Horaces Duskywing 9</p>

<p>Zarrucos Duskywing 6</p>

<p>Dotted Skipper 1</p>

<p>Dion Skipper 1</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>Weymouth woods =E2=80=93 Scotland Lake =E2=80=93 Lake Bagget =E2=80=93 W=
atson
Lake</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>Swamp Darner 0-1-0-0</p>

<p>Common Sandragon 0-1-0-0</p>

<p>Prince Baskettail 0-0-0-8</p>

<p>Alabama Shadowdragon 0-0-2-0 (LIFER)</p>

<p>Cinnamon Shadowdragon 0-0-1-0</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>Banded Pennant 0-1-3-3</p>

<p>Ornate Pennant 0-75-15-0</p>

<p>Eastern Pondhawk 8-30-4-4</p>

<p>Little Blue Dragonlet 0-6-3-0</p>

<p>Golden-winged Skimmer 0-3-2-1</p>

<p>Yellow-sided Skimmer 3-4-0-0</p>

<p>Elfin Skimmer 0-120-20-0</p>

<p>Blue Dasher 1-3-0-3</p>

<p>Eastern Amberwing 0-5-4-7</p>

<p>Carolina Saddlebags 0-5-1-0</p>

<p>Black Saddlebags 0-1-0-0</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>Ebony Jewelwing<span>=C2=A0
</span>8-0-2-0</p>

<p>Sparkling Jewelwing<span>=C2=A0
</span>1-3-0-0</p>

<p>Elegant Spreadwing 0-1-0-0</p>

<p>Swamp Spreadwing 0-1-0-0</p>

<p>Variable Dancer 35-10-25-0</p>

<p>Seepage Dancer 0-105-40-0</p>

<p>Burgundy Bluet 0-1-1-0</p>

<p>Cherry Bluet 0-91-1-0</p>

<p>Orange Bluet 0-1-2-4</p>

<p>Pale Bluet 0-1-0-0</p>

<p>Attenuated Bluet 0-10-1-2</p>

<p>Sphagnum Sprite 0-2-5-0</p>

<p>Lilypad Forktail 0-6-2-55</p>

<p>Citrine Forktail 0-20-3-0</p>

<p>Fragile Forktail 0-40-10-0</p>

<p>=C2=A0</p>

<p>HERPS</p>

<p>Cottonmouth =E2=80=93 (2) 1 in defensive coil on surface of
water, vibrating tail and gaping at us</p>

<p>Yellow-bellied Slider</p>

<p>Sandhills Salamander =E2=80=93 Undescribed Eurycea new species 2
=E2=80=93 1 beautiful adult</p>

<p>Southern Cricket Frog</p>

<p>PINE BARRENS TREEFROG =E2=80=93 heard a few, tracked one down for
amazing photos</p>

<p>Copes gray treefrog</p>

<p>Pine woods treefrog</p>

<p>Fowlers Toad</p>

<p>Southern Toad</p>

<p>Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad</p>

<p>Carpenter Frog</p>

<p>Eastern Fence Lizard</p>

<p>Green Anole</p>

<p>Ground Skink</p>

<p>Six-lined Racerunner</p>

<br clear=3D"all"><br>-- <br><div dir=3D"ltr"><div>Brian Bockhahn</div>
<div><a href=3D"mailto:<birdranger248...>" target=3D"_blank">birdrange=
<r248...></a></div>
<div>=C2=A0</div></div></div></div>
</blockquote></div>

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