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List: Carolina-Leps
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2021 17:23:50 +0000 (UTC)
From: smitcb777 (via carolinaleps Mailing List) <carolinaleps...>
Subject: Re: Pine Elfin question

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I have definitely seen Pine Elfins spending time in the canopies of trees.=
=C2=A0 I watched half a dozen or more one day acting just as Juniper Hairst=
reaks would, except much higher on the upper 1/3 of a group of tall pines.=
=C2=A0 They were perched on the ends of branches, patrolling and dog-fighti=
ng around these few trees the whole time I watched, over an hour.=C2=A0 Non=
e came any farther down the tree from the upper 1/3, despite wet sand and n=
ectar available in the immediate area of the same power line cut.=C2=A0 Thi=
s was in northern VA, south of Washington, DC (upper coastal plain, althoug=
h much different looking than the Carolinas).=C2=A0
In my experience Pine Elfins are rarer in the lower coastal plain, becoming=
more common in the upper coastal plain, and not uncommon in the piedmont a=
nd mountains, at least in the right habitat at the right time of year. My g=
uess is that they do not naturally host on Loblolly or Longleaf Pines.=C2=A0
Tom Smith


-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Forsythe <carolinaleps...>
To: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...>
Cc: ROBERT CAVANAUGH <papilio28570...>; Carolinaleps <carolinaleps@d=
uke.edu>
Sent: Fri, Mar 26, 2021 12:55 pm
Subject: Re: Pine Elfin question

I saw my 1st Pine Elfin in I'On Swamp. Charleston Co. in 2000 and I did not=
see another until 8 years later.

Dennis
On Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 12:42 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinaleps...> wrot=
e:

Bob -- Don' t even begin to think you are the first person to wonder why th=
is species is so scarce in its overall range, and not just in NC!!=C2=A0 I =
am quite sure that various pines indeed are hostplants, as is well discusse=
d.=C2=A0 And, as the species has been recorded nearly statewide, it isn't l=
imited to just Virginia Pine (scarce in the Coastal Plain), etc.=C2=A0 Whit=
e-M Hairstreak host plants are oaks, and they can be quite difficult to loc=
ate in a given year, as well.=C2=A0 Oaks are everywhere too.
I have not heard anyone say that E. Pine Elfins spend tons of time in the c=
anopy of pine trees; if they did, that would explain why so few are actuall=
y seen.=C2=A0 We DO know that both Juniper and Hessel's hairstreaks spend m=
ost of the day well up in the 2 cedar species; we can see them fly up to hi=
gher branches when disturbed from a flower, and people with long nets can b=
eat on branches well up and at times flush one.=C2=A0 Early Hairstreaks see=
mingly spend most of the day well up or in hardwood trees, rarely coming to=
the ground or a low flower.=C2=A0=C2=A0 So -- I wouldn't rule out that Pin=
e Elfins spend much time well up in pine trees, but I don't know if this ha=
s been reported.

Yes, most of us are lucky to see one in a given year, and you almost need t=
o be out every day or several times a week in the spring season to stumble =
onto one, as there is absolutely no way to target where and when to find on=
e!=C2=A0 My best advice is to walk along the margins of pine or mixed woods=
or pine thickets and look for some flowering shrubs like plums.=C2=A0 I've=
seen a few on dirt roads, some in powerline clearings on various flowers, =
etc.=C2=A0=20

Good luck, and don't look for pines to make your search.

Harry LeGrand
=20
On Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 11:52 AM ROBERT CAVANAUGH <carolinaleps...> w=
rote:

Every several years I will see a Pine Elfin here in Carteret but considerin=
g that pine is the most abundant tree on coastal Carolina, why are these bu=
tterflies so rare?=C2=A0 It makes me wonder if pine is really the preferred=
host.=C2=A0 Loblolly pine is the dominant species here.
Over the years of reading this list service I don't recall many sightings m=
entioned.
Thoughts from others.... ?

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



--=20
Dennis M. Forsythe PhDSouth Carolina Christmas Bird Count EditorSouth Carol=
ina eButterfly reviewerEmeritus Professor of BiologyThe Citadel171 Moultrie=
St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>=

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<div style="color:black;font: 10pt arial;">I have definitely seen Pine Elfins spending time in the canopies of trees.&nbsp; I watched half a dozen or more one day acting just as Juniper Hairstreaks would, except much higher on the upper 1/3 of a group of tall pines.&nbsp; They were perched on the ends of branches, patrolling and dog-fighting around these few trees the whole time I watched, over an hour.&nbsp; None came any farther down the tree from the upper 1/3, despite wet sand and nectar available in the immediate area of the same power line cut.&nbsp; This was in northern VA, south of Washington, DC (upper coastal plain, although much different looking than the Carolinas).&nbsp;
<div><br>
</div>

<div>In my experience Pine Elfins are rarer in the lower coastal plain, becoming more common in the upper coastal plain, and not uncommon in the piedmont and mountains, at least in the right habitat at the right time of year. My guess is that they do not naturally host on Loblolly or Longleaf Pines.&nbsp;</div>

<div><br>
</div>

<div>Tom Smith<br>
<br>
<br>

<div style="font-family:arial,helvetica;font-size:10pt;color:black"><font size="2">-----Original Message-----<br>
From: Dennis Forsythe &lt;<carolinaleps...>&gt;<br>
To: Harry LeGrand &lt;<hlegrandjr...>&gt;<br>
Cc: ROBERT CAVANAUGH &lt;<papilio28570...>&gt;; Carolinaleps &lt;<carolinaleps...>&gt;<br>
Sent: Fri, Mar 26, 2021 12:55 pm<br>
Subject: Re: Pine Elfin question<br>
<br>

<div id="yiv3845782282">
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<div dir="ltr">I saw my 1st Pine Elfin in I'On Swamp. Charleston Co. in 2000 and I did not see another until 8 years later.
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<div>Dennis</div>
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<div class="yiv3845782282yqt4758102710" id="yiv3845782282yqt86586">
<div class="yiv3845782282gmail_quote">
<div class="yiv3845782282gmail_attr" dir="ltr">On Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 12:42 PM Harry LeGrand &lt;<a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" shape="rect" ymailto="mailto:<carolinaleps...>" target="_blank" href="mailto:<carolinaleps...>"><carolinaleps...></a>&gt; wrote:<br clear="none"></div>
<blockquote class="yiv3845782282gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex;">
<div dir="ltr">
<div>Bob -- Don' t even begin to think you are the first person to wonder why this species is so scarce in its overall range, and not just in NC!!&nbsp; I am quite sure that various pines indeed are hostplants, as is well discussed.&nbsp; And, as the species has been recorded nearly statewide, it isn't limited to just Virginia Pine (scarce in the Coastal Plain), etc.&nbsp; White-M Hairstreak host plants are oaks, and they can be quite difficult to locate in a given year, as well.&nbsp; Oaks are everywhere too.</div>

<div><br clear="none"></div>

<div>I have not heard anyone say that E. Pine Elfins spend tons of time in the canopy of pine trees; if they did, that would explain why so few are actually seen.&nbsp; We DO know that both Juniper and Hessel's hairstreaks spend most of the day well up in the 2 cedar species; we can see them fly up to higher branches when disturbed from a flower, and people with long nets can beat on branches well up and at times flush one.&nbsp; Early Hairstreaks seemingly spend most of the day well up or in hardwood trees, rarely coming to the ground or a low flower.&nbsp;&nbsp; So -- I wouldn't rule out that Pine Elfins spend much time well up in pine trees, but I don't know if this has been reported.<br clear="none"></div>

<div><br clear="none"></div>

<div>Yes, most of us are lucky to see one in a given year, and you almost need to be out every day or several times a week in the spring season to stumble onto one, as there is absolutely no way to target where and when to find one!&nbsp; My best advice is to walk along the margins of pine or mixed woods or pine thickets and look for some flowering shrubs like plums.&nbsp; I've seen a few on dirt roads, some in powerline clearings on various flowers, etc.&nbsp; <br clear="none"></div>

<div><br clear="none"></div>

<div>Good luck, and don't look for pines to make your search.<br clear="none"></div>

<div><br clear="none"></div>

<div>Harry LeGrand<br clear="none"> </div>
</div>
<br clear="none">
<div class="yiv3845782282gmail_quote">
<div class="yiv3845782282gmail_attr" dir="ltr">On Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 11:52 AM ROBERT CAVANAUGH &lt;<a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" shape="rect" ymailto="mailto:<carolinaleps...>" target="_blank" href="mailto:<carolinaleps...>"><carolinaleps...></a>&gt; wrote:<br clear="none"></div>
<blockquote class="yiv3845782282gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex;">Every several years I will see a Pine Elfin here in Carteret but considering that pine is the most abundant tree on coastal Carolina, why are these butterflies so rare?&nbsp; It makes me wonder if pine is really the preferred host.&nbsp; Loblolly pine is the dominant species here.
<div id="yiv3845782282gmail-m_-1369231671502894183gmail-m_-8806943530809140039yMail_cursorElementTracker_1616773807634"><br clear="none"></div>

<div id="yiv3845782282gmail-m_-1369231671502894183gmail-m_-8806943530809140039yMail_cursorElementTracker_1616773808084">Over the years of reading this list service I don't recall many sightings mentioned.</div>

<div id="yiv3845782282gmail-m_-1369231671502894183gmail-m_-8806943530809140039yMail_cursorElementTracker_1616773892927"><br clear="none"></div>

<div id="yiv3845782282gmail-m_-1369231671502894183gmail-m_-8806943530809140039yMail_cursorElementTracker_1616773893218">Thoughts from others.... ?<br clear="none"><br clear="none">
<div id="yiv3845782282gmail-m_-1369231671502894183gmail-m_-8806943530809140039ymail_android_signature"><a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" shape="rect" id="yiv3845782282gmail-m_-1369231671502894183gmail-m_-8806943530809140039ymail_android_signature_link" target="_blank" href="https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://go.onelink.me/107872968?pid=InProduct&amp;c=Global_Internal_YGrowth_AndroidEmailSig__AndroidUsers&amp;af_wl=ym&amp;af_sub1=Internal&amp;af_sub2=Global_YGrowth&amp;af_sub3=EmailSignature__;!!OToaGQ!8Lnuo6rmm4cim-Rx7GIgopx82GZcye9gp8Z-aO56sn1ZY1bKiAQB0H770y9%0D%20RIKKtVY8$">Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android</a></div>
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<div dir="ltr">Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
<div>South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor</div>

<div>South Carolina eButterfly reviewer</div>

<div>Emeritus Professor of Biology</div>

<div>The Citadel</div>

<div>
<div>
<div>171 Moultrie St,<br clear="none">Charleston, SC 29409<br clear="none">843.795.3996-home<br clear="none">843.953.7264-fax<br clear="none">843.708.1605-cell<br clear="none"><a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" shape="rect" ymailto="mailto:<dennis.forsythe...>" target="_blank" href="mailto:<dennis.forsythe...>"><dennis.forsythe...></a></div>
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