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List: Carolina-Leps
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2022 12:33:49 -0400
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinaleps Mailing List) <carolinaleps...>
Subject: Re: The Chatham County, NC, mystery of the Giant Swallowtails "solved"

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Typo -- her name is *Debbie* Roos -- not Dennie (yes, it is Roos and not
Ross). I forgot to proof her first name -- "n" is next to "b" on the
keyboard!

Harry

On Mon, Sep 5, 2022 at 12:31 PM Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:

> Folks,
>
> In looking at the Facebook Carolina Leps group a few minutes ago, there is
> a significant posting by Dennie Roos, whom I know as an Ag Extension
> specialist in Chatham County who often works with gardeners and butterfly
> lovers there. Here is her posting:
>
> "This morning I got to re-home some unusual caterpillars! Yesterday friend
> Billie Shambley tagged me on a Facebook post asking for ID of some large
> caterpillars she had found on her Meyer lemon trees. They were giant
> swallowtail larvae! I knew we had giant swallowtails in Chatham County
> because folks occasionally contact me asking for ID. But I had never seen
> one myself. Billie didn't want her lemon trees defoliated so I offered to
> take them. One of their host plants is trifoliate orange, also called
> hardy orange, or bitter orange. I also knew Billie's neighbor Andy Upshaw
> has regularly seen giant swallowtails at his place so I asked if I could
> bring the larvae there and he was happy to oblige since he has lots of
> trifoliate orange. So I picked up the larvae from Billie this morning and
> brought them down the road to Andy's and we put them on his plants. They
> immediately started munching down because they had been in a jar overnight
> with some lemon leaves and were hungry. At Andy's I got to see some giant
> swallowtails nectaring on lantana and zinnias so it was a great morning!
> Host plants include members of the citrus family (in Florida, the
> caterpillars are called orange dogs). The hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata) is a
> NC native host. Chatham County near Pittsboro."
>
>
> There are a number of photos showing the "Orange Dog" caterpillars, the
> leaves on the tree, and an adult swallowtail.
>
> So -- as we know, this eastern Piedmont county has had a number of records
> of adults of E. Giant Swallowtails over the past few years, but neighboring
> counties have not. I would thus expect that MOST of these adults have been
> reared in this single yard on this/these lemon trees.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> PS -- Will or others -- can you get the URL posted here? I forget how
> that is done for the entire post with the photos -- I can do it for single
> photos.
>

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<div dir=3D"ltr">Typo -- her name is <b>Debbie</b> Roos -- not Dennie=C2=A0=
(yes, it is Roos and not Ross).=C2=A0 I forgot to proof=C2=A0her first nam=
e -- &quot;n&quot; is next to &quot;b&quot; on the keyboard!<div><br></div>=
<div>Harry</div></div><br><div class=3D"gmail_quote"><div dir=3D"ltr" class=
=3D"gmail_attr">On Mon, Sep 5, 2022 at 12:31 PM Harry LeGrand &lt;<a href=
=3D"mailto:<hlegrandjr...>"><hlegrandjr...></a>&gt; wrote:<br></d=
iv><blockquote class=3D"gmail_quote" style=3D"margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;bord=
er-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir=3D"ltr"><div =
dir=3D"ltr">Folks,</div><div dir=3D"ltr"><br></div><div dir=3D"ltr">In look=
ing at the Facebook Carolina Leps group a few minutes ago, there is a signi=
ficant posting by Dennie Roos, whom I know as an Ag Extension specialist in=
Chatham County who often works with gardeners and butterfly lovers there.=
=C2=A0 Here is her posting:</div><div dir=3D"ltr"><div><br></div><div>&quot=
;This
morning I got to re-home some unusual caterpillars! Yesterday friend=20
Billie Shambley tagged me on a Facebook post asking for ID of some large
caterpillars she had found on her Meyer lemon trees. They were giant=20
swallowtail larvae! I knew we had giant swallowtails in Chatham County=20
because folks occasionally contact me asking for ID. But I had never=20
seen one myself. Billie didn&#39;t want her lemon trees defoliated so I=20
offered to take them. One of their host plants is <a></a>trifoliate
orange, also called hardy orange, or bitter orange. I also knew=20
Billie&#39;s neighbor Andy Upshaw has regularly seen giant swallowtails at=
=20
his place so I asked if I could bring the larvae there and he was happy=20
to oblige since he has lots of trifoliate orange. So I picked up the=20
larvae from Billie this morning and brought them down the road to Andy&#39;s
and we put them on his plants. They immediately started munching down=20
because they had been in a jar overnight with some lemon leaves and were
hungry. At Andy&#39;s I got to see some giant swallowtails nectaring on=20
lantana and zinnias so it was a great morning! Host plants include=20
members of the citrus family (in Florida, the caterpillars are called=20
orange dogs). The hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata) is a NC native host.=20
Chatham County near Pittsboro.&quot;</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><di=
v>There are a number of photos showing the &quot;Orange Dog&quot; caterpill=
ars, the leaves on the tree, and an adult swallowtail.=C2=A0=C2=A0</div><di=
v><br></div><div>So -- as we know, this eastern Piedmont county has had a n=
umber of records of adults of E. Giant Swallowtails over the past few years=
, but neighboring counties have not.=C2=A0 I would thus expect that MOST of=
these adults have been reared in this single yard on this/these lemon tree=
s.</div><div><br></div><div>Harry LeGrand</div><div>Raleigh</div><div><br><=
/div><div>PS -- Will or others -- can you get=C2=A0the URL posted here?=C2=
=A0 I forget how that is done for the entire post with the photos=C2=A0 -- =
I can do it for single photos.</div></div></div>
</blockquote></div>

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